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How Twitter landed me a $2k per month client & B2B leads

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How Twitter landed me a $2k per month client & B2B leads

Deepak Shukla
How Twitter landed me a $2k per month client & B2B leads

How to use Twitter to land $2k/month clients and B2B leads

Do you use Twitter? Maybe you have an account for the sake of having an account. Perhaps you hook it up with Buffer and leave it running automatically or maybe you just use it socially. However, if that is all you are using it for, you could be missing out. I use twitter to generate B2B leads and connections on a regular (weekly) basis and want to show EXACTLY how I do it and how you can do the same.

Join me on the SEMrush Webinar on May 25th where I will discuss this in more depth - click here to sign up.

Proof Twitter Is Working For Me

In the interests of ‘putting my money where my mouth is’ - I first offer evidence of what's actually happening:

1. People contact me directly (see below - this turned into a $2k per month client)

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2. People connect with me on LinkedIn - (several a week) it's where I direct them - more on this later 

3. People sign up for my free courses (a couple a week)

4. Slow and steady growth of my Twitter account (Over three months it's grown from 9.9k impressions per week to 15.5k impressions per week)

Much like LinkedIn - it begins with getting your profile set up right to start with.

Profile Setup

Before you head out and just start engaging with people, it is important your profile looks the part, otherwise you are in danger of looking spammy - and you will flounder. So, before getting into my engagement process let’s run through how your profile should look - starting with examining some examples of how it shouldn’t look:

I recently got a direct message like this:

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I actually like it. It has a lot of credentials that make the pitch interesting enough for me to dig further. The English is not perfect but I was prepared to overlook that as he mentioned being a Forbes contributor (big names work).

So naturally, I wandered over to his profile to check him out - and we can see he has clearly has put some effort into creating his profile: 

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But, let me run you through what doesn’t work:

1. This image that he has been using for his profile picture has been cartoonized (which isn't a problem) - but badly so - it looks like an MS Paint filter. 

You can head over to Fiverr and get something pretty professional done very quickly:

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See the difference?

2. There is a real abundance of ‘@’ symbols which makes it overtly promotional.

3. There could have been a better attempt of highlighting his social proof here. It doesn’t even look like Canva or some such platform was used to design this.

So. This tweeter is a self-styled digital marketer.

Now you could contend that ‘not everyone is attempting to be a digital marketer’. So I cast my net further.

I have just run a search for the name ‘Adam’ on Twitter. Results are as below:

e83d1a136a481bb66548c44b3dcffd31.png

Now, this runs at around a 50/50 split of tweeters with a commercial intent (see the green word 'COMMERCIAL' - or more if you include Mr. Political) vs. those who are on Twitter for personal reasons.

Yet, just one of the commercial Twitter profiles (@countingcrows, 'Letters from Adam') looks as though it’s had thought put into it. The others have a range of issues from brash profile covers to no profile cover at all to cropped profile pictures.

You get the idea.

With all of this in mind, let’s run through some appropriate setup stuff before we move on to engagement.

Profile Picture

It is only right we use my own profile as the example :p. With your Twitter profile picture you don’t need to do anything fantastic other than to make it clear and noticeable.

Let me show you what I've done with mine:

I have simply cropped out my upper body from my Facebook picture and used my ear to ear grin on Twitter - to make sure my face didn't get lost in the crowd:

My suggestion - always do the same.

Let me know show you how this helps:

Look how my face appears when I ran a Twitter search for my own name from another account:

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Whose picture looks the clearest and most recognizable?

Profile Cover Image

This is not utilized enough. Cover images are an excellent opportunity to leave simple marketing messages or build your brand strength.

With this in mind you can leverage your header photo to convey a message. So rather than a mundane cover:

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You can take a note out of the National Geographic's profile cover and promote something:

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 You might wonder how to make your own version of this header image. If you are like me and have close to zero design chops than you will be happy to know:

  • Making a professional header photo IS NOT hard
  • You just jump onto Google search to get the appropriate header size (1500px by 500px)
  • Then plug that into Canva using one of their free templates.
  • It should look a little something like this:

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  • Canva offers layouts, free templates and a pretty much a bulletproof way of designing images. You should check it out!

Mobile Sizing

Now here’s the key part that most don’t get to.

Keep playing with the cover image and checking how it displays on your mobile. Don't resize your Chrome browser (as I did the first time) - but actually, check on your mobile (although there are plenty of Chrome plugins that can do this).

The idea here is that the CTA should be both visible on desktop and on mobile as shown:

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Profile Bio

So, there is a lot of information out there as to what constitutes a good profile. You can use hashtags, funny one-liners, and a range of other options to strike the balance between a personable and promotional profile.

A couple of firm rules that I stick by are:

  • If I am using hashtags/or referencing other profiles - I use only a maximum of two in total.
  • The profile is premium space so I don’t want to ‘keyword stuff’ it. I believe it doesn’t have enough of an SEO/CRO effect to make it hugely worthwhile.
  • When splitting up different bits of data in your bio/headline - it is best to use pipe characters (|) as they neatly divide the content.

So in practice, this is how it looks:

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You will notice that I don’t talk in terms of my services. I let my personal credentials demonstrate my domain experience. It makes far more a powerful statement than saying e.g. ‘Facebook Marketing’

CTA In Your Profile

This is definitely something you should consider - as it provides a reason for the user to click on the link that you provide in your profile bio. 

Amy Porterfield does excellently at this:

Hashtags In your Profile

From an SEO perspective the more keywords and hashtags you have the better. However, that is SEO for an algorithm rather than a human. So bear this in mind: while you may appear more often in search as a consequence of keyword stuffing via hashtags and the like, it can make you seem much more like a bot than a genuine Twitter user. So, I recommend to stay away from more than #2 #hashtags

Tracking Link

This is critical as something that you must add to your Twitter profile. A tracking link. I recommend Bit.ly for this. It is simple to setup, effective - and gives you the ability to measure the efficacy of your Twitter marketing.

  • Is Twitter useful?
  • Is it driving any actual traffic?
  • Where is it all coming from?

As you can see it offers:

  • Number of clicks:

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  • Growth over time 
  • And locations:

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The point here is that you can’t manage what you can’t measure - and this applies for your clients as well as your own accounts.

Activity

So let’s get talking about actual activity. Assuming we have your profile all set up and ready to go, the next step is actually spreading your message.

Using Buffer

So using Buffer is nothing new for readers of SEMrush I’m sure. Most people that use Buffer will put out tweets that look like this:

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Notice where it’s been underlined that there’s a short link - it’s the buffer shortener used to track links for their analytics.

Given you can check your twitter analytics from your Twitter profile, I suggest leaving your checking of the raw data inside Twitter, and most data analytics apps will connect with Twitter anyway, so you lose nothing.

With this in mind, it's perhaps better to have links appear in their original form so that readers don't feel that they are being marketed to:

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Buffer will automatically include their shortening link (as in truth most platforms do), so to turn this ‘on’ or ‘off’ just head here:

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And then here:

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Using Quuu

Of course then there comes the question of ‘where do I source content from?'. With the free plan that Buffer offers, there is no option to add an RSS feed:

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But in truth, the issue that comes with RSS feeds is that unless you have a diverse range (e.g 10-15+ sources) it feels like you are just running promotions from the same website. Buffer handily has more apps/integrations than pretty much almost any other social scheduling tool out there.

I did a quick count and it appears that there are 65 integrations that they have to date.

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Quuu is one of them, and for $2.50 USD a week you get six content suggestions per day:

So that’s six pieces of content going out on Twitter per day from relevant interest categories (Quuu’s 100+ categories means there are multiple areas that are relevant to my business).

As you can see, Quuu pretty much caters for everybody unless your niche is particularly out of this world:

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Join me on the SEMrush Webinar on May 25th where I will discuss this in more depth - click here to sign up.

Using IFTTT

If This Then That is duct-tape for the internet - connecting apps together so they 'talk to each other'(I’m quite sure I stole that from somewhere).

So in a bid to drive further engagement - I use IFTTT to humanize my updates as much as possible:  i.e. have some regular tweets that actually relate to me and not just third party Quuu updates.

Here is how I have my IFTTT set up:

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I have seven Twitter IFTTT integrations, of which around five are active and four are listed here.

I put:

  • My Instagram pictures out on Twitter to show ‘hey I’m real’.

  • A ‘have a good weekend’ message.

  • A promotional tweet to my LinkedIn profile out - my main social conversion house.

As you can see IFTTT is VERY powerful - I recommend you explore it.

Using Crowdfire

There arise a range of automated tools for Twitter that probably sit at the edges of Twitter’s TOS - which marketers use quite heavily I’m sure. One, which is semi-automated, has really helped me drive conversions is Crowdfire. They have a very handy follow-unfollow tool that forms part of their daily ‘prescriptions’ - i.e actions to take using their tool.

I won’t take you through the entirety of Crowdfire, but I recommend that you take a deeper look at it because it has a range of powerful tools that can help you grow. For now, I want to show you the two tools that I make use of specifically for growth:

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  1. Crowdfire will allow you to identify Twitter handles that might be relevant to your audience. You can then look at the followers of a handle such as @foundr (shown above) and choose to follow their followers. The idea then is that some of them will follow you back.

Notice there isn’t a prevalence of ‘marketers’ that I am interested in above (where it reads ‘saved accounts of interest’). Why? Because marketers follow marketers. And, my buyers won’t be other marketers, so I recommend you take the time to consider this when deciding which accounts are of interest.

2. If that is not enough, you can do the same thing with keyword follows as well. I tend to make more use of the former, relying upon other accounts to do a better job of building up a healthy following which I can then reply upon

However, it’s not just those two tools I make use of:

The other part of it is unfollowing others.

I try and follow a 4:1 ratio such that I follow 50-100 people per day 4 days in a row and then on the 5th day I’ll unfollow 100-200 people (i.e. every Friday).

  1. This is the tab to go to to check out who I’m following that isn’t following me back (you can see where this is going).

  2. I then sort by those who have not been following me back for a fair while (i.e the people I followed some time ago).

  3. This is the ‘unfollow’ button - you can click through these fairly rapidly

Driving Leads From Twitter

Now we get to one of the most interesting parts. The power of auto-direct messaging or ‘DMs’. Many folks use this horrendously so it gives marketers and marketing a bad name. I’m going to admit something. I was in poor form with this until not too long ago.

Let me show you what I mean:

My old Crowdfire setup

  1. I used to use the free version of Crowdfire which means it appended the  ‘via @crowdfireapp’ to each message - which looks (and is) cheap - get the paid version.

  2. This message is too overtly promotional and could easily foster annoyance rather than interest.

Having only realized this how much better this could be when I saw someone leave me an intriguing direct-message - I immediately emulated him and now across Purr Traffic our direct messages read a lot like this:

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Any active Twitter user knows that as a digital marketer I am out here marketing, but by being honest from the outset it disarms the situation.

Let’s go through what I have written carefully:

  1. I'm open as to my nominal use of Twitter - ‘I don’t use Twitter as much as I’d like’

  2. I offer a preferred line of communication. - LinkedIn

  3. I also offer a series of free courses in case the tweet on the other side doesn't want to chat - online courses

  4. Then I finish up with my job title, company name, and slogan 

How Twitter Functions as Part of a Wider Ecosystem

Finally, if you’re looking at generating business leads from Twitter, remember that Twitter alone simply isn’t enough.

The way that a general Twitter user versus a potential buyer will analyze your profile is quite different. Users will NOT look beyond your twitter account - or if they do it doesn’t matter how you present yourself. They are not spending money with you.

If you are selling a product or service, however, Twitter should form part of a broader marketing matrix, as it stands to reason (and my proof demonstrates it) that a purchaser will check you out across other platforms as well. So, Twitter in isolation isn’t comprehensive enough to win clients.

Wrapping Up

So that is how I have been using Twitter, in a nutshell, to automate leads into my online funnels. As time goes by, it will no doubt evolve. The above reflects around 80% of the steps I take in building my Twitter profile and engagement in a manner that converts.

But there is a further 20% I have yet to touch upon, and I will explain this in more depth during my SEMrush Webinar on May 25th.

Twitter Cards and Their Power

I’ll be discussing how I use Twitter cards for further opt-ins and driving leads:

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Super Fan Accounts

Having just one account is a fool’s game - I will be discussing the strategy I use to grow my main account and drive further leads in this system here

The Power of Recurring Posts

As your audience grows - the chances of them seeing your promotional posts get smaller and smaller - and there are specific services built around posts that get sent out on a schedule. I’ll show you how I use this here to drive further leads to Purr Traffic.

Join me on the SEMrush Webinar on May 25th where I will discuss this in more depth - click here to sign up.

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Digital Marketing Director at Pearl Lemon. TedX Speaker on Social Media. LinkedIn Influencer
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Great practical tips Deepak. I was thinking to use Crowdfire free for a long time but not want to add via @crowdfire in every message. Need to invest in paid plan.
Deepak Shukla
Vikas Disale
Thanks Vikas really appreciate your kind words!
Royce S.
Nice stuff Deepak, I also use Twitter for lead gen.
Did you hear of Hypegrowth ( [link removed by moderator] ) ? Basically, it takes the proactive engagement to the next level and automates everything for you - you just need to set it up initially and it runs for you on autopilot which is a huge time saver. I simply set it to follow people relevant to the audience I am trying to attract and they often come back to my profile and often click the link to the website. How do I know they are real? Because I make sales and as we all know fake followers don't buy things :)
Deepak Shukla
Royce S.
H Royce thanks for reaching out! Sounds interesting! Can I see your Twitter buddy? :)
Arnie Singer
I think one huge issue digital marketers face relating to Twitter is how much time to spend on it. Twitter can easily suck up your entire day, every day. What's the ROI on that time, and how exactly can you measure it is the big question.
Deepak Shukla
Arnie Singer
Intelligent question Arnie - no easy answer here haha. Setting limits is probably wise. But of course it depends if Twitter is extremely relevant to your business - are you in marketing?
Adina Pascall
This is excellent practical advice!! I've already started to see results from using the copy followers feature on Crowdfire to grow my Twitter following!
Deepak Shukla
Adina Pascall
Thanks Adina for your comments - and yes Crowdfire is handy like that!
I'm jacking that auto-message ;p - Nice work Deepak
Deepak Shukla
Imran Esmail
haha - go for it Imran!
Wow, really like the detail and effort you have put in to writing this. The profile pic you use really works, it really stood out when I was sifting through people. I also like how you use so many different tools to automate what you are doing and whole heartedly agree with hashtags in your profile, I have several (not just 2) but I deal with results driven decision makers so they quite like that I get to the point ASAP of what it is I actually do. Thx for the heads-up, I will almost certainly be reviewing my approach on Twitter to bring it into line with yours bud. Duncan
Deepak Shukla
Duncan Gledhill
Hi Duncan - thanks for your comments - yes I found that adapting the profile pic was v.useful - thanks for your kinf words!
As someone who hasn't been sure on Twitter's use for business I was curious to read this article - you've certainly presented a strong case for it​
Deepak Shukla
Jack Ponte
Hi Jack well yes people forget about b2b completely when they think about Twitter
Deepak- The example automated DM's are a great reference point thanks for that!! I can't wait to use all of the tips!!
Rob Morrisby
Hey Deepak. Really liked all this. I didn't think that profile pictures made that much of a difference, but your article made me think about that a bit more. Probably something I should think about too. Thanks for telling me the recommended size for banner images too - much appreciated!
Deepak Shukla
Rob Morrisby
Hey Rob no worries at all - I'm glad that you enjoyed the article and I was able to offer some further insights into the profile picture - it's simple but surprisingly effective!
Rock solid article and thanks for all the depth. Very tactical and action oriented, and many can utilize it right off the bat.
Deepak Shukla
Rokham
Rokham - love the feedback - thanks so much dude :)
Steve Collins
Great post Deepak, admittedly Twitter is definitely an underused tool for us and we would like to be getting more from it. You mentioned about a max recommended number of #'s to use but what are your thoughts on post length?
Deepak Shukla
Steve Collins
Hi Steve thanks for the comment buddy - and it's a good point. I stick to short thought provoking questions and content. But it's also good to do more such as ask your audience questions alongside adding some images of you/your business - mine are fed from Instagram via IFTTT - the combo works well for me - I hope this helps!
Ravi Shukle
Great post Deepak, really appreciate you taking the extra time to provide not only practical examples of tools we can use but how we can actually use them based on your experience. Glad you've mentioned the part about adding a human touch to your social channels as a lot of businesses can find automating posts a golden bullet and forget that they have to engage in real time as well. Look forward to hearing more on your webinar.
Deepak Shukla
Ravi Shukle
Hi Ravi thank you for the kind words - and yes I agree there is often that danger of having an account that's completely 'botted' and it doesn't help anybody! )
Looking fwd to working with you, Deepak! Talk soon!
Deepak Shukla
Doru
Ditto Doru - thanks for stopping by! :)