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Weekly Wisdom with Joel Bondorowsky: Day Parting Report

Weekly Wisdom with Joel Bondorowsky: Day Parting Report

Joel Bondorowsky

This video is part of our Weekly Wisdom series which will feature experts on a variety of topics. 

Transcript

Hello to all the amazing internet marketers. Today I’m going to explain to you the “how to” of a Day Parting Report in Google Ads, and why this is important to get an edge over your advertising competitors.

Anyone doing PPC is used to checking their campaign, ad group, ad, and keyword performance regularly.

Conversion rates directly correlate to the value of the traffic they send. The higher the conversion rate, the more valuable the traffic the keyword delivers. Therefore, the keyword can afford a higher bid.But if this is all you are looking at, your campaigns could be performing much better, and you wouldn’t even know it. 

The reason is that the collection of clicks and sales that produce your conversion rate aren’t all happening at the same time, location, or even device. They can be segmented by many different dimensions.

If you are not actively adjusting bids for variations of performance across these dimensions, you are paying too much for lower converting traffic, and too little for higher converting traffic. To make matters worse, if your advertising competitors are making proper adjustments, they will outrank you more with traffic converts better, and you will outrank them for worse converting traffic.

You must regularly segment your campaigns by dimensions to understand how this may be impacting you and adjust accordingly.Now I will show you in a few simple steps how to create a report so that you can understand how much conversion rate variations by hour of the day and day of the week are hurting you so that you can make the proper adjustments.

First Part - Extracting the Raw Numbers from Google

This report can be divided into two steps. The first step is where you extract data from Google, and second is where you create the report in excel.

  1. Click on the reports icon.

  2. Click Custom - to create a custom report.

  3. Select Table - because you’re going to want to produce a table which is then downloaded as a CSV file and then opened up in Excel.

  4. Date Range - chose a range that you would like to analyze. 

  5. Filter Campaigns - that you would like included in the report.

  6. Rows - you want to drag over:

    1. Day of week

    2. Hour of Day

    3. Campaign

  7. Columns - you will want:

    1. Clicks

    2. Conversions

  8. Download report as CSV

  9. If you want to run this report on a regular basis, you can choose to save it and scheduled. You can even have it emailed to you automatically so that you don’t need to repeat these steps.

Second Part - Creating The Report

Now that you have the report downloaded, we can proceed onto the second part which is actually creating the report in Excel.

  1. Open the report with Excel.

  2. Save it as an Excel xls file.

  3. Create a pivot table in a new sheet - selecting the columns and rows that we are analyzing; this would be everything except for the top rows that are labels for the report such as date range and so on.

  4. Insert CVR as a calculated field.

  5. Make columns percentages.

  6. Move two decimal points.

  7. Conditional formatting per column - formatting for all the columns so that visually the colors can show you which hours are the best and which are the worst.

  8. Add campaign name as a filter - so that you can select different campaigns that you would like shown for the analysis; this will enable you to see everything at once, or just a few at a time.

This is what it looks like when it is done:

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Conclusion - What to Do with This Information

And now we are done creating the report. Next comes the analysis, which is simple, thanks to the visual nature of the report which shows clear patterns.

Now that we have created the report, we can analyze it; this is actually pretty simple, thanks to the visual nature of the report itself which lets you simply look at it and see some clear patterns. Conditional formatting makes the hours of the day that have higher conversion rates stand out in a darker green while the worse hours of the day are orange.

Each row in the report from 0 to 23 represents a different hour. The grand total on the bottom row is the average conversion rate for that particular day. The conversion rate on the right column for each row is the average conversion rate for that particular hour, spread out across every day of the week while the conversion rate on the very bottom right cell, 0.6%, represents the overall conversion rate for the campaign itself.

Now…0.6%, if you are not doing day parting, you are bidding for that average conversion rate across the board; this means that you are not aggressive enough during the better converting hours which are highlighted in dark green and you are too aggressive during worse hours of the day which are represented in the red, and the orange. Besides missing out on better traffic when it converts better, your competitors will grab that better traffic if they are making proper bid adjustments.

You must adjust bids so that you are more aggressive during the green hours, and less during the red hours. If not, your competition will, thus outranking you when traffic is converting, and you outranking them when traffic is not. These adjustments can be made in your camping settings.

One tip, if your campaigns aren’t profitable, you may consider scheduling your campaigns so that they don’t even run during the bad hours. What that would do is instantly increase conversion rates; thus your value per visitor and possibly, from one small step, turn a losing campaign into one that is profitable.

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Joel Bondorowsky
Superstar

Knows everything… well, almost.

Joel Bondorowsky can be described as a true PPC addict. The last thing he does before bed is check his stats, which is also the first thing he does after waking up. It is his love for the job that feeds this addiction. He dabbled with his first small campaigns back in 2000, when PPC was at its infancy. However, it wasn’t until 2010, when he started working at Wix.com, when he got into more extreme PPC. After leaving Wix, Joel started a boutique ad agency called Quality Score where he managed some of the largest PPC campaigns in history. Today, he serves as the SEMrush Academy PPC professor s well as founder of PPCDesigns, a new boutique agency providing tailor made marketing solutions for large, mass market activities.
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